back to school globe cookies

Decorated Cookies

Back to School Globe Cookies Tutorial

Written by Mike Tamplin Aug 5, 2013

94 Comments

Back to School season always reminds me of a funny misunderstanding I had that didn’t really get cleared up until the 3rd grade. It had to deal with maps like the one below.

map of the United States

You see, during my early years of elementary school, I remember having to memorize the map of United States; I don’t remember there being a requirement to understand it. For the longest time, I thought Alaska and Hawaii were next to each other and located below Texas, in real life. It was shown this way on practically every U.S. map, so I didn’t think to question it.

Sure, back then I understood Alaska was cold and Hawaii was hot, but I couldn’t explain why. I thought it was probably the same phenomenon that allowed Tomorrow Land to be next to Fantasy Land at The Magic Kingdom.

Long story short, it wasn’t until someone finally pointed out these states to me on a globe that I understood their true whereabouts. So to help prevent future confusion with new school recruits I made Back to School globe cookies.

  1. 1

    Two types of cutters

    To make these globes, I cut the dough using a 3-inch round cutter and an ice cream sundae cutter as shown below.

    how to make a globe cookie cutter
  2. 2

    Creating the base

    The top portion of any ice cream sundae cutter will work for the base for these cookies. I got theses ice cream cutters from Jo-Ann Fabrics, but they may not be available anymore. If you can’t find them, a margarita cutter would work, too.


  3. 3

    Create guide lines

    After the cookie is baked, start by making a few guide lines with a food coloring marker to help with the icing process. With a smaller circle and a straight edge, trace a circle and its middle axis slightly off-center and to the top-right corner. It’s off-center to make room for the round support ring.

  4. 4

    Draw a half ring

    Next, I drew freehand a half ring around the lower half of the circle. If you’re wondering why I made dotted lines, I’m not sure. It just felt easier to draw evenly spaced rings if I made dots instead of a solid line.

  5. 5

    Outlining the base

    To make the base, I piped an outline with chocolate brown icing in a series of bowl shapes. Starting from the bottom and working my way up to the blue line, I pipe 3 mounds, each smaller than the last. I topped off the base with circle shape and outlined over the outer ring lines as well.

    The outline should look like this:

  6. 6

    Filling the base

    Next, fill the ring area, as well as every other base section with chocolate brown flood icing. While the base sections were still wet, I made an “L” shaped shine accent with light brown piping icing.

  7. 7

    Fill other sections and add highlights

    After the icing had time to set (about 15 mins.), fill the remaining base sections and add the shine accent. Also, outline and fill the globe circle with blue royal icing. Leave this to dry for a few hours or overnight.

  8. 8

    Piping the countries

    After the base is completely dry, I piped countries of the world in various colors with piping icing. I used piping consistency icing to get that “rough” look you see on some globes. Also, I had a map of the world nearby on my iPhone that I used as a visual reference. The country shapes aren’t exact or to scale, but its close enough that I think people will get the idea.

Finished globe cookies

These globes were part of a larger Back to School cookie set I made. I’ve been on a vintage kick ever since making the vintage vacation cookies a few weeks ago. I continued the trend by making these cookies have a vintage feel to them as well.


Back to School season may mark the end of summer vacation, but it also marks the start of the Fall new season of TV shows. So there’s that to look forward to.

Have a great start to the week!

This post is linked up to one of these link parties.

Tags:

Filed under:

94 replies on “Back to School Globe Cookies Tutorial

  1. Mike, I’m always amazed when I see your work, but this time I think you have outdone yourself. I love your globe! I miss seeing them around. There’s something about twirling a globe that many children today may be missing out on. Thank you for giving me a trip down memory lane!

  2. Estoy impresionada con tu trabajo soy novata empiezo ahora a hacer galletas y rsta la del mumdo es preciosa!!!!

  3. I’m just starting with cookies so I spend a lot of time in the web looking for new shapes and I find your work, and it’s amazing. WOW

    Sorry if my english is not Ok.

    1. Your English is perfect! Thank you, Gabby.

  4. Hi there, I desire to subscribe for this web site to obtain most recent updates, therefore where can
    i do it please help out.

  5. Your work is amazing. The detail unreal. Thank you for sharing your work!

  6. Do you have tutorials or a cookie cutter for the stack of books? They are great! :)

    1. Hi Jessica, sorry I don’t. I made these a couple years ago. Maybe I’ll revisit them when it’s back-to-school season. Thanks for the nice comment!

      1. Just noticed your question and wanted to let you know I’ve seen globe cookie cutters in several sites that sell cutters. King Arthur Flour has a nice one. Most are sold as snowglobes which will work fine but you may want to alter the base a bit.

  7. You’re thoughts about the map is no worse than my belief at that age that everything on the radio was live. I couldn’t figure out how singers got to the stations so fast or at the same time. But then, in the 1960s we didn’t see all the things kids see today and we were so gullible about so many things. There was also a potato chip company that drove tan and brown speckled trucks. We alse have a potato chip company out of Lancaster about two hours from us named Utz so for YEARS I thought UPS trucks were another chip company. My family laughed at me when I asked why I never found this UPS brand in the market. So you’re not the only one who thinks odd things as a kid. At least we were young kids, there are adults today that believe far worse.

Leave a comment

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *